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Brevity is the Key with Emails

Kids don’t send many emails these days and rely instead on texting, so even more of a reason to share some tips about emailing with them. The key? Brevity. What was once considered rude in letter format is now proper etiquette when writing an email. Here’s more:

  • People are burdened with email. Help relieve their burden by keeping your message concise and clear. Brevity in an email shows respect for your reader’s time.
  • Don’t bother with the niceties like asking “how are you” unless you have a real reason.
  • If you need a yes-or-no answer, make sure you are asking a yes-or-no question
  • If you need to set up a meeting, don’t just say you need to set up a meeting; suggest a time and place.
  • Shoot for five sentences or less.
  • Keep your subject line short. It will likely be read on a mobile device so six words max. Never leave the subject line blank. That’s rude. And never put the whole message in a subject line; that’s a text message.

Make it Personal

Personalization is the key to effective parent-school communication, according to a survey of parents, teachers and school leaders by the Center for American Progress. The survey found that in-person, parent-teacher conferences were preferable to technology-based communication, with research associate Abby Quirk saying, “We thought there might be special interest in options that use technology because they’re newer, they offer potentially more options, but what we found was that the technological advancement, so to speak, of the communication method really wasn’t that important. What we found was that the individualization was really important.”

Email Antiquated When It Comes to College Acceptances

While parents are used to being the sole receiver of important information about their kids, the college application process marks one of the first times when the communication goes directly through the teenage applicant. According to some experts, this could be a flawed process, as colleges primarily use email for communicating with prospective students, yet teenagers statistically do not default to email to communicate. Critical information sent via email may be lost in a crush of other messages. Research shows high schoolers don't commonly use email, and it is possible for important information to fall through the cracks when they're inundated with messages, experts say.

Watch What Your Do With Your Email Address

You might think that entering and storing personal data for easier access to online sites is convenient, but generally speaking, it's not a great idea. Breach after breach proves as much. Many sites require entering an email address to register or gain access to full features, but it can also be fodder for spam. If you are visiting a site that doesn’t seem credible or trustworthy but requires entering your email, consider creating a disposable email address.

Educators Worry About Emails From Parents

Thinking about sending your child’s teacher an after hours email? You might want to wait until the next school day. Some educators in Australia are asking for a break from the burden of answering emails sent by parents after hours and on weekends. The State School Teachers Union there says that some parents expect lengthy, instant responses, which is why they are seeking to include a provision that offers teachers a reprieve in their contracts.

Educators Worry About Emails From Parents

Thinking about sending your child’s teacher an after hours email? You might want to wait until the next school day. Some educators in Australia are asking for a break from the burden of answering emails sent by parents after hours and on weekends. The State School Teachers Union there says that some parents expect lengthy, instant responses, which is why they are seeking to include a provision that offers teachers a reprieve in their contracts.

An Email Time Calculator

How many hours of your life have you wasted checking work email? Check out this calculator offered by The Washington Post. A new report from Adobe says that, on average, white-collar workers in the US spend 4.1 hours checking their work email each day. That’s 20.5 hours each week, more than 1,000 hours each year, and more than 47,000 hours over a career.

An Email Time Calculator

How many hours of your life have you wasted checking work email? Check out this calculator offered by The Washington Post. A new report from Adobe says that, on average, white-collar workers in the US spend 4.1 hours checking their work email each day. That’s 20.5 hours each week, more than 1,000 hours each year, and more than 47,000 hours over a career.

Addicted to Email

While kids are texting and chatting using various apps, most adults are still emailing. In fact, if you are in the business world, you may be expected to check your emails constantly. Recent studies show that not only do office workers spend 33% of their workday reading and writing email, but science now says there is a clear link between spending time on email and stress.

 

What can we do to reduce the amount of our valuable time spent checking emails? Jocelyn K Glei, an advocate of mindful productivity and the author of “Unsubscribe” says we first need to admit that email is an addictive game. She writes, “Productivity is no longer about keeping up, or keeping busy, or having it all. It’s about being deliberate and being focused. It’s about spending more time deciding and less time doing. It’s about getting really clear on what matters to you and letting the rest go. With email—as with everything else in life—you must say “no” to some opportunities, in order to say “yes” to your priorities.” Her book is full of suggestions on how to do just that.

Addicted to Email

While kids are texting and chatting using various apps, most adults are still emailing. In fact, if you are in the business world, you may be expected to check your emails constantly. Recent studies show that not only do office workers spend 33% of their workday reading and writing email, but science now says there is a clear link between spending time on email and stress.

 

What can we do to reduce the amount of our valuable time spent checking emails? Jocelyn K Glei, an advocate of mindful productivity and the author of “Unsubscribe” says we first need to admit that email is an addictive game. She writes, “Productivity is no longer about keeping up, or keeping busy, or having it all. It’s about being deliberate and being focused. It’s about spending more time deciding and less time doing. It’s about getting really clear on what matters to you and letting the rest go. With email—as with everything else in life—you must say “no” to some opportunities, in order to say “yes” to your priorities.” Her book is full of suggestions on how to do just that.

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